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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
, think about paris. cnn's alina cho tells us why in this week's travel insider. >> reporter: i lived in paris during college, so going back always brings back memories. one of my favorite things to do, then and now, sit outside and sip espresso or a glass of wine at a cafe. the french invented the concept. cafe de flore is my pick. and for dinner, across the street is also great. if you've never been to paris, take an afternoon on a sunny day and ride this boat. they are open air and allow you to see the entire city by sea. for the arts, this museum houses spectacular murals by monet. for shopping head to avenue montaigne, the madison avenue of paris. then, grab your walking shoes, walking all the way up and back down is a great way to work off a meal. and speaking of food, don't forget to buy a real baguette sandwich, or a crepe on the street. soon you'll feel like a native. alina cho, cnn, paris. >>> how old is the big blue planet that we're all living on right now? 10,000 years old? or 4.5 billion years old? the one and only bill nye the science guy will tell us what he thinks. at
in paris. send slaves to the louisiana territory to sign contractors with planters who will take them for a year or two and train them and then give them their own plots of land and free them. and he specifically referred to reviving the plan that we doesed in paris. >> yes. >> but that's the plan. >> well, i don't, i mean, this plan you're talking about sending slaves to louisiana while the french own it? >> no. this is the 1789. it. >> we bought it. >> you food note from 1789. it can't be about the l.a. purchase. >> why meant was jefferson was in paris and discussed the plan with edward, he not only discussed it with william short but with thomas paine. when the hour of decision came again about whether we would have slavery in louisiana, pane reminded the president of what he had proposed in france namely -- the bran kroft letter. to put -- to bring slaves in for a short amount of time to teach them, you know, proper agricultural and set them free. >> okay. i . >> [inaudible conversations] what jefferson is talking about. i don't see jefferson encouraging the mingling of german and
was seen in public he flew to a paris hospital age 75 and sick. three weeks later he was dead. why? his wife refused an autopsy. rumors flew, aids murdered, poisoned, that's what many palestinians believed. >> all the circumstantial evidence, all the political evidence indicate only one direction, which is mr. sharon. >> reporter: israel denies it. there was no real evidence he had been killed, until this year. the investigation was triggered by swiss technicians working with al jazeera tv. they examined arafat's toothbrush and hat and found traces of radioactive polonium 210. ten times more toxic than cyanide. the question now is, will they find it on his bones? >> the likelihood of being able to detect polonium 210 this long after contamination i think is very low. >> reporter: in that case, how did they find it on his clothes? the tests could raise more questions than it answers. yasser arafat, controversial in life, his death still a riddle. martin fletcher, nbc news, ramallah, the west bank. >>> in this country and parts of this area in fact, life remains at a cold dark standstill
homeric, i believe. >> rose: this is what he said in an interview with the paris review. "i have nothing to say about myself directly. i wouldn't know where to begin, in particular since i often look at myself in the mirror and say "whot the hell is that?" >> well, i think he probably had a pretty good idea of who have the hell that was. >> rose: and appreciation of who have the hell that was. >> yes, indeed. although he used mirrors as a metaphor for all kinds of -- i mean in a speech the last paragraph is all about when we look in the mirror. >> rose: is there something to be said or a reason to understand why he moved from poetry early in his life to prose later? >> i think he was always writing poetry and he continued to write poetry throughout the period of writing plays and prose. i think he ran out of gas for plays in the late 20th century but continued to write poetry and poetic prose up until his death. his love for antonia is an extraordinary and remarkable enduring testament to the power of adult relationships. >> rose: and scandalous in its beginning. >> scandalous from other
by both president paris and president clip torn. >> stuart eizenstat, "the future of the jews." this is booktv on c-span2. >> tell us what you think about our programming this weekend. you can tweet us at booktv, comment on our facebook wall or send us an e-mail. booktv, nonfiction books every weekend on c-span2. >> so i, our book is science left behind, and it's about the rise of the anti-scientific left. we call it feel-good fallacies and the rise of the anti-scientist left. as ken said, my name's alex, and i've got my ph.d. in microbiology from washington. just a little bit about me, my background is entirely microbiology. a friend of mine said i look like an ubergeek in that picture, so i thought i'd put it up there. we grew all sorts of extremely smelly bacteria in that thing. i went to the university of washington in 2004, and i got my ph.d. in 2010 and immediately became editor of real clear science, so i've been in the real world for two years. so my personal science philosophy is rather straightforward and simple. if you're not an expert, it is best to accept what is
to flee the country because of the high income tax increase. stephane has more in paris. as we look at some pictures, how has this gone down in the rest of france? are they viewing this as a criticism of the french tax system or of him? >> it's all about francois hollande. he explained the policy of the government, including fiscal policy. there's not much room for depardieu this morning. but it's not a big surprise. it's one less paying taxes in france as a result of the new tax policy implemented by the socialist government. it's a report from the belgium newspaper, which is reporting that gerard depardieu brought a property in a small village located just by the french border, and plans to escape the tax implemented by the government. the mayor of the village was unable to confirm that gerard depardieu bought a home in the village. it wouldn't be surprising, though, because this small village already has a 27% french population. it's not glamorous like london, geneva or even monaco, but it would be the place to pay less taxes and being close to french border. he earned two millio
. the first children's hospital was founded in 18 02 in paris. they've recognized then that children were not the same as adults. why are we ostriches and have our head in the stand? you could excuse it up until the end of the second world war. people went straight from school and work probably of the age of 14 and there was no choice. there was not at and between group. since the '50s, since all this, -- elvis, since my age group, what is the bloody excuse? [laughter] all i can say is, i think this is something you will do in your country very quickly, because what i love about america is the thing, we can do this, we will do it, we will make it work and we will donate. these are your teenagers. they need your support. they are your community and they are your future. you deserve to have it better. [applause] >> i just have one or two. what inspired you to set up the teenager and young adult cancer center? why there? >> mainly because i was doing a charity show and someone's back garden. rebecca was doing it for autism. and another teenage program. at that party dr. david feinberg, in c
. adams was the american minister to the court of st. james. jefferson the american minister to paris. jefferson made a tremendous contribution. he sent to his friend madison over 200 books on political thought, political history. my surmise is that some of those books must have been about the dutch federation. jefferson was not there. he did get his hands on a copy very quickly of the constitution. we e-mailed a copy for him over in paris. he said, where is the bill of rights? the answer was, there is no bill of rights. every people on earth is entitled by nature to a bill of rights which protect them against their government. this foreshadowed a problem. george mason was one of the members of the virginia delegation. he had written the declaration of the rights for the state of virginia in 1776. it was a few months before jefferson wrote the declaration of independence. when the convention was over, mason, who was a member of the virginia delegation, was a member of the virginia delegation, would not sign the constitution. washington was infuriated. so came about one of the great in
or paris or korea, and you start pointing out that no, we're not as good, it will create a sense of maybe shaking the complacency, which i think is the first step. there is a complacency here that people -- opinion leaders and people that have more disproportionate influence, don't view their own kids' plight as bad at all. and we need to create some awareness, i think, as john said, through information that this is a serious challenge for our country and it's, you sadly it's changing who we are as a nation and we're losing our competitive edge because of it as well. >> and this project under way, a really good one, and then also the common assessment to bring it right down to the kid level, how your child is doing in relation to these rigorous and we hope world class standards, will certainly give people information. at the same time, however, if you've got a smug suburban constituency and the teachers in those schools are also grumping that the politicians and the policymakers are making their life harder, threatening their jobs, giving them too much to do, narrowing the curriculum. >>
as well as in washington and paris that algeria could be used to play a constructive role in this anticipated military intervention should it materialize. however, officials and observers within the region are -- [inaudible] and perhaps we can touch on some of this in the q&a. thank you. [applause] >> thank you very much. thank you very much, alexis, you helped us understand, perhaps, the dog that didn't bark and perhaps gave us a framework for understanding whether that'll be true in the future, and you laid out really an uncertain path ahead and helped illuminate the inner relationship between domestic politics and regional security concern. we'll wrap our panel here with two overviews, um, the first provided by dr. paul sullivan who also joined us for the last panel. dr. sullivan is going to give us an economic sort of toward the horizon of the region and help us understand some of the sparks that help drive change and may yet derail it. dr. sullivan? >> well, i'm not sure i would agree that that dog may not bark sometime in the future. algeria had its problems in the e
carroll has this edition of "black in america." >> reporter: the gospel choir had paris hichltparishoners on . this is harlem, new york. take a second look at this congregation and you'll see the black church here changing. >> inspiring and i definitely will come back. why not? >> reporter: tourists, many european, have been packing the pews of harlem churches in increasing numbers. michael henry adams specializes in harlem's history. >> it is voyeurism to a degree. i thought of it as something bad initially but it's learning more about each other and there's nothing bad in that. >> reporter: what's happening is not just white tourism but of something greater. do you see the identity of harlem shifting or changing? >> demographically, would you have to see that there is a change. the harlem of my youth, when i would come to harlem, doesn't look the same. >> reporter: statistics show hispanics and whites outpacing the number of blacks moving into harlem. >> you can no longer make the assumption that all persons who are nonafrican-americans, who are whites were tourists. like everyone else,
hurtphd in paris. and elizabeth lower-basch got her master's at harvard. william is an independent from massachusetts, you are on. caller: happy thanksgiving. i just want to know, what is poverty in america? what does that mean? host: we discussed that earlier. guest: $20,000 a year, $30,000, $50,000? are these companies sitting on millions of dollars? the governmentwhy are they sitts money when they could be hiring people? host: veronique de rugy, the figure that we decided on for a family of three? guest: $18,000 for a family of four. but a lot of the programs, the poverty programs -- and there are 126 different poverty programs, 22 different food programs, and people always assume there are a few. there are many of them. the eligibility depends on -- food stamps at the federal level are 30%, right? states can add to that number, so it really varies, your eligibility varies on the program, based on the federal standards, and the states once. host: would you like to address the caller's issues about u.s. corporations? guest: when we see surveys of companies, they are nervous about cons
or paris or korea and you start pointing out that now, we are not as good, it will create a sense of maybe there is a complacent view that people -- opinion leaders and people that have more disproportionate influence don't see their own kids life is not at all. we need to create some awareness that this is a serious challenge for our country and sadly is changing who we are as a nation where the singer could edit a page as well. >> a project underway, a really good one and also the common core assessments and how your child is doing in relation. we hope world-class standards. at the same time, however, got a smug, suburban constituents the end in the schools that are also grown in the policy makers are making their life harder, threatening their jobs, giving them too much to do, narrowing the curriculum, teaching to the test. you've got a complacent constituency in grumpy teachers. how does the reformer prevail? [laughter] >> well, you know, i think i mentioned this to you, we have to look at this new core of people coming into the profession and that kind of won't run in and dismissive t
during the seeing of paris providing political and humanitarian support. q & a sunday night at 8:00 on c-span. >>> former florida governor jeb bush called for higher education standards in the u.s. delivering opening remarks for the town dangers fifth annual summit on education reform. the two-day summit is host bid the foundation for excellence. it includes education secretary an knee duncan and state policy makers inspect is thirty minutes. [applause] good morning, everybody. it is with great pride i'm going to introduce governor bush this morning. we met a over twenty five years ago, i don't think he has it on the rÉsume still, i was in tallahassee and i helped recruit move jeb to tallahassee in 1986 and i don't think he has forgiven me for that. but he was a secretary of commerce, as you may remember for a couple of years, and after i negotiated salary then governor elect renegotiated his salary not upward but downward, as it turns out that's why he doesn't like me. we blame friends as he served in the administration and in 1993, twenty years ago after coming off of the statewide ca
scientists found an almost complete skeleton of a woolly mammoth. near paris. >> wow. >> this is a rare find in france. they've named it helmet. it could be anywhere from 50,000 to 200,000 years old. how do you say cool in french? helmut. i bet they don't call it helmet. but it's spelled helmut. >> thank you, christine. quite a find. 19 minutes past the hour. musical glove is teaching people how to play the piano just by wearing it. >> this could help people with spinal cord injuries regain their hands. joe carter has this technovags. >> wearing a glove may not make a dance like michael jackson. but it could teach you how to play music. >> this is the music tough glove. it's going to teach you how to play a piano melody without you paying attention to it. >> reporter: created by students and professors at georgia tech the glove uses vibration to teach your fingers the notes of a song. so you're going to teach me how to play o susannah. i've got zero experience. never played before. >> we will have you wear the glove for hopefully around 30 minutes or so. you can be reading your e-mail or jog
like london and paris and frankfurt, and what's really important about being in those locations is it gives them an advantage over their competitors in that they're able to provide lower latency, able to provide a shorter distance from point a to point b for their customers. >> so that's something you like, and you've also been looking around at a pharmaceutical company in canada. what do you see there? >> yes, valiant pharmaceutical we think is a pretty interesting not your typical pharmaceutical company. when you think about a big pharma company you think about them spending a lot of money on r&d for drug development. that's not what valeant does. they're spending 3% instead of 20% on revenue. they're going out and they're finding interesting niche drugs and drug companies and acquiring them and they're cutting the expens expenses, plugging the drugs into their distribution and able to add a lot of shareholder value by doing that. >> so what first brought to you valeant? what made you find that company? >> we found it on a screen with our bottom up process we do a lot of scree
society debut at crillon ball in paris. she's every bit the great-niece of jfk, who at the same age worked at the american embassy in london, traveled through south america and received a purple heart for his valor during the navy during world war ii. no purple heart for kick, but "town & country" says she is the niece that jackie would have loved. >> i think so. and lindsay lohan wasn't available. so we had to go with what we could get. >> had to go there. >> just kidding. yeah, i think she's great. i have to commend your pronunciation of the crillon ball. impressive for a guy from alabama. >> i try to go there at least every other year. >> kick is great. i think we're at a moment where the kennedys keep on coming at you. joe iii is back in congress taking over barney frank's seat. kick is emerging in a little different vein as a kennedy who doesn't really want to go into politics but is spending most of her time in l.a. and working for her father's cause with clean water. >> she's out of the family business. >> it looks like it. you know, they always seem to get sucked back in. so she st
is pushing the eurozone into a new recession. oecd joining us from paris. good morning. we have a huge debate in this country about austerity and what it means. reading your new report, will seems to be a suggestion that the austerity in europe is actually holding things back. is that right? >> the thrust of the report shows that number one there is a need that the united states don't go over the fiscal cliff. but also that if you don't, there is growth in the united states and that in fact is the area that will be recovering faster. second, in the case of europe, good news, the greek package yesterday, thousand we still have to address institutional issues having to deal with countries under pressure like spain or italy, and of course solving the whole of the debt problems and getting all the elements of the machinery in place, a bazooka has to be fully loaded ready to fire, are made k markets have to know the bazooka is there in case there is greater volatility. but there is institutional progress, but we see a 2013, 4 2014 scenario of slow growth, sluggish growth, picking up a little in
. it is ridiculous. we are in 2012. the first children's hospital was founded in 18 02 in paris. they've recognized then that children were not the same as adults. why are we ostriches and have our head in the stand? you could excuse it up until the end of the second world war. people went straight from school and work probably of the age of 14 and there was no choice. there was not at and between group. since the '50s, since all this, since my age group, what is the bloody excuse? [laughter] all i can say is, i think this is something you will do in your country very quickly, because what i love about america is the thing, we can do this, we will do it, we will make it work and we will donate. these are your teenagers. they need your support. they are your community and they are your future. you deserve to have it better. [applause] >> i just have one or two. what inspired you to set up the teenager and young adult cancer center? why there? >> mainly because i was doing a charity show and someone's back garden. rebecca was doing it for autism. and another teenage program. at that party dr. david f
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)